Sunday, October 21, 2007

Tasting Aveyron in Paris


Last week, I posted about an Aveyron food festival that had gone on in Paris recently. Since I don't always read the local papers -- and I'm duly ashamed of that fact -- I managed to find out more about it by visiting one of my local butchers.


I was standing in line waiting to pick up a few steaks for lunch when I heard one of M. le Boucher's customers ask him "Vous vous êtes bien amusé à Paris?"

My ears pricked up. And, much to everyone's surprise, I started asking questions. It turns out that Alain Ginesty, who runs an excellent boucherie-charcuterie-traîter in Sébazac near Rodez, had been to the festival -- and had indeed had a great time.

He was kind enough to lend me the brochure about the Marché des Pays de l'Aveyron which took place in Paris the weekend of October 5-7. Over 75 local food producers were plying Parisians with Aveyron's fabulous food specialties, such as aligot, fouace and Marcillac wine.

For those of you -- and from your comments I know you are out there -- who haven't yet experienced aligot, know that you can do so in Paris:


These are just two Aveyronnais restaurants in the City of Light, but I'm sure there are many more. Remember, you really haven't lived until you've tasted aligot!



Many thanks to Mr. Alain Ginesty for lending me the brochure about this event!



9 comments:

katiez said...

In the instant potato section at the Carrefour I saw a foil bag of 'Aligot' I decided it was the same in principle, but I'll wait for the real thing - or try to make it myself! - Naw, where's the fun in that?

Betty C. said...

There is absolutely no fun in making aligot oneself - take it from someone who tried and whose arm almost fell off in the process!

Some of the ready-made aligots are very good, including the one made by the Coopérative de Jeune Montagne in Laguiole. Its aligot is packaged in a vacuum-packed format, in the refrigerator section. You still get the fun of heating it up and stirring it until it stretches (jusqu'à ce qu'il file, comme on dit ici...)

Tinsie said...

Surely there no *fun* in making anything yourself? I'm convinced even beans on toast tastes better when someone else has prepared it!

Expat Traveler said...

Oh that looks so lovely! Decided to pop in and visit my blog list since it's been forever!

wcs said...

There's a place in Paris 3eme called the Ambassade d'Auvergne (I know, not Aveyron), but their specialty dish is aligot. I've eaten there once for the experience. I liked it.

Is there a difference between Aveyron aligot and the Auvergne aligot? Different cheese? Our local fromager carries tomme fraiche, which I understand is the kind of cheese for aligot.

Bolder said...

I LOVE aligot... had it for lunch just the other day accompanied by it's side kick the saucisse. Nothing's better on a cold day...

Betty C. said...

wcs,

There are endless debates about how to make the best aligot, especially concerning whether or not to include garlic. But as far as I know, there's not a particular difference between aligot from Aveyron, Cantal, or Lozère. But this subject is proving of such interest that I may have to do some more serious research into it!

Tomme fraîche is indeed the kind of cheese you would need.

Why don't you and Ken try making it (a grueling process) then I can lift a few fingers to link to your post about it (not quite as tiring, LOL!)

Anonymous said...

Actually, I miss aligot a lot... It's good to promote it!! But, I'm not so much agree with the precedent comment : the best aligot I've eat in my mum's made. But anyway, I know it's so difficult to make it good for not experimented people in typical aveyronnese cooking (so am I).
Anyway, just a word : enjoy enjoy enjoy aligot!
Lucile

Betty C. said...

Lucile,

Of course your Mom's aligot would be the best! That's a given! Moms' dishes are just always the best...